Yes I’ll take your money Facebook, but I’ll take those learning points too

You’d have to be a very sour individual not to be happy at the news that Google, and now, after a brief Mexican (Australian?) standoff, Facebook will be putting hand in pocket to pay for news content.

On the other hand you’d have to be a very naive newsperson to think that the deals being struck signal the end of traditional media’s decades long struggle to find its place in a digital world.

The fact that Facebook is rolling out Facebook News in Germany, following similar moves in the UK and prior to that in the US is a step in the right direction. It performs the invaluable services of putting money in the media’s bank account while potentially helping to distinguish between fake news and the real deal.  Which is good news for news.

Getting the most out of the tech giants can’t just be about feeding on the scraps that fall from their tables.

Steve Shipside

But before breaking out the bubbly, let’s not forget what the deal doesn’t change. As a media person I’m not going to complain about getting money back from the tech giants, but it isn’t a licence to carry on as before and hope that the dollars will flow. That revenue model has already sailed. Getting the most out of the tech giants can’t just be about feeding on the scraps that fall from their tables. It’s about analysing what it is they are doing right and plundering any and all learnings from that which can be used to promote our own businesses.

Axel Springer repeats its claim that the agenda of Facebook and co. is to become news brands themselves

Steve Shipside

I don’t think it is coincidence that the outstanding refusenik of the Facebook News deal in Germany happens to be Axel Springer which tellingly not only criticises the amount of money involved, but repeats its claim that the agenda of Facebook and co. is to become news brands themselves.

Back in 2012 I remember that same Axel Springer sending its top executives to live in Palo Alto to learn first hand how Silicon Valley worked its magic. 

Few of us can afford to relocate our management teams to Silicon Valley in order to steal its secrets, but that’s why I for one will be keen to see what the likes of Frédéric Filloux, Edward Roussel, and George Brock can share about Silicon Valley’s inside track – from the comfort of my own home.